Protein Quality, Digestion, and Bioavailability

Protein, it's what's for dinner...and breakfast and lunch and snack

Protein, it’s what’s for dinner…and breakfast and lunch and snack

Protein Quality, Digestion, and Bioavailability

We have discussed many times here just how important protein is and we’ve discussed how much protein you should ingest on a daily basis, but we have yet to cover protein bioavailability. Bioavailability is the measure of how much protein is actually used and digested by the body. The scale tops out at 100 meaning 100% of the protein is digested and used by the body, of course this is ideal as no protein is wasted. Certain types of whey protein powders called hydrolysates go through a process that pre-digests the powder making them actually over 100% bioavailable and are the main outlier in the scale. A breakdown of the bioavailability of some popular proteins is below:

Protein Source

Bio-Availability Index

Whey Protein Isolate and Hydrolysate

100-159

Whey Concentrate

100

Whole Egg

100

Cow’s Milk

91

Egg White

88

Fish

83

Beef

80

Chicken

79

Casein

77

Rice

74

Soy

59

Wheat

54

Beans

49

Peanuts

43

As you can see whey protein powders rank at the top of the chart for bioavailability with whole eggs leading the pack for whole food sources. Remember that score is for the yolk and white while white alone trails behind. The most interesting part about the bioavailability scale is how highly animal proteins score as opposed to plant based proteins. Plant based proteins may in theory contain a good amount of protein but when it comes down to it only some of that protein is usable by the body.

Bioavailability is something important to consider when choosing protein sources as it allows you to see what may be the best bang for your buck. For example you would need to eat twice as many servings of beans to equal one serving of whole egg protein. The healthiest and best way to get your protein is through various sources, for instance using whey powder in a few shakes throughout the day, some eggs for breakfast and beef for dinner. By varying sources you will take advantage of each proteins unique range of amino acids and accompanying vitamins and minerals ensuring you are taking in a wide spectrum of nutrients.

Scott Mailman

Atlasathletics1@yahoo.com

Twitter: @atlasathletics

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Training Log Updated 10-8-12

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Protein Quality, Digestion, and Bioavailability

Protein, it's what's for dinner...and breakfast and lunch and snack

Protein, it’s what’s for dinner…and breakfast and lunch and snack

Protein Quality, Digestion, and Bioavailability

We have discussed many times here just how important protein is and we’ve discussed how much protein you should ingest on a daily basis, but we have yet to cover protein bioavailability. Bioavailability is the measure of how much protein is actually used and digested by the body. The scale tops out at 100 meaning 100% of the protein is digested and used by the body, of course this is ideal as no protein is wasted. Certain types of whey protein powders called hydrolysates go through a process that pre-digests the powder making them actually over 100% bioavailable and are the main outlier in the scale. A breakdown of the bioavailability of some popular proteins is below:

Protein Source

Bio-Availability Index

Whey Protein Isolate and Hydrolysate

100-159

Whey Concentrate

100

Whole Egg

100

Cow’s Milk

91

Egg White

88

Fish

83

Beef

80

Chicken

79

Casein

77

Rice

74

Soy

59

Wheat

54

Beans

49

Peanuts

43

As you can see whey protein powders rank at the top of the chart for bioavailability with whole eggs leading the pack for whole food sources. Remember that score is for the yolk and white while white alone trails behind. The most interesting part about the bioavailability scale is how highly animal proteins score as opposed to plant based proteins. Plant based proteins may in theory contain a good amount of protein but when it comes down to it only some of that protein is usable by the body.

Bioavailability is something important to consider when choosing protein sources as it allows you to see what may be the best bang for your buck. For example you would need to eat twice as many servings of beans to equal one serving of whole egg protein. The healthiest and best way to get your protein is through various sources, for instance using whey powder in a few shakes throughout the day, some eggs for breakfast and beef for dinner. By varying sources you will take advantage of each proteins unique range of amino acids and accompanying vitamins and minerals ensuring you are taking in a wide spectrum of nutrients.

Scott Mailman

Atlasathletics1@yahoo.com

Twitter: @atlasathletics

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Training Log Updated 10-7-12

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#1 Post of the Week: How many calories should I eat daily to lose weight?

How many calories should I eat daily to lose weight?

Decisions, Decisions

Simply put a calorie is the measure of energy produced from the burning of material which in our bodies that means from the burning of food. The energy produced from the burning of food is used to power all our bodily functions. Believe it or not the liver is the organ that requires the most energy to function properly. It requires roughly 27% of our bodies energy expenditure, followed by the brain at 19%, our muscle tissue at 18%, kidneys 10%, the heart only requires 7%, with the rest of our organs combining for 19%. A certain number of calories is required to run your bodily functions but an excess of calories particularly in the form of fats and carbs are what lead to weight gain. As a matter of reference proteins are 4 calories per gram, carbs are 4 calories per gram as well, but fats are 9 calories per gram. Through many studies it has been determined that the base amount of calories for proper functioning is between 14-16 calories per pound of bodyweight. So an individual weighing 180 lbs would require 2700 calories per day. In general women, men with slow metabolisms, and individuals that do not perform much daily physical activity should use 14 calories per pound and men as well as women with fast metabolism should aim for 16 calories per pound. Individuals who perform daily strenuous activity could even fall into the 17 calories per pound range. If fat loss is your goal your range would be 10-13 calories per pound of bodyweight to create a caloric deficit and force the body to use up stored fat. If mass/weight gain is your goal then 17-19 calories per pound of bodyweight is the zone you would be in. Exact numbers will depend much on the results you see at that particular level. If you are looking to lose weight and drop to 13 calories per pound of bodyweight and do not see any change in 2-3 weeks then you would adjust and lower your caloric intake. Don’t forget to adjust as your weight adjusts as well. If you started at 180 lbs then went down to 175 you need to recalculate your caloric needs based on your new weight.

Scott Mailman

Atlasathletics1@yahoo.com

Twitter: @atlasathletics

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Training Log Updated 10-6-12

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#2 Post of the Week: Fruit: Good Healthy Breakfast Food for Fat Loss or Not?

Fruit: Good Healthy, Breakfast Food for Fat Loss or Not?

You do not have to avoid fruit to lose weight, but you should consume them in moderation. Like all types of carbs, Fructose, the sugar contained in fruits causes insulin to spike thus telling the body to burn carbs for energy as opposed to fats. This is important as the earlier in the day you have fruit, say with breakfast, the less time the body is in a state of thermogenesis or fat burning. When thermogenesis is turned off the body goes into fat storage mode, not ideal of course. Do not confuse High Fructose Corn Syrup with the Fructose in fruits. HFCS is highly processed, found in most junk foods and can lead to many health issues. Fructose may be one of the healthier carbs, but it is still a carb and when seeking fat loss should be minimized. Don’t eliminate fruit, but if you are trying to lose weight or are concerned about your metabolism, limit fructose from all sources to 5 to 10 grams a day. For very active individuals 20g to 30g of fructose should be the maximum. Berries are your best bet for fruit because they are lower in fructose and contain a great deal of antioxidants, for example a cup of blueberries contains about 7.5 grams of fructose and 21 g total carbs

Not a great breakfast choice

Scott Mailman

Atlasathletics1@yahoo.com      

Twitter: @atlasathletics

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